2021 No Cameras Allowed: My Career lowest as an outlet sale Outlaw Rock and Roll Photographer outlet online sale

2021 No Cameras Allowed: My Career lowest as an outlet sale Outlaw Rock and Roll Photographer outlet online sale

2021 No Cameras Allowed: My Career lowest as an outlet sale Outlaw Rock and Roll Photographer outlet online sale
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Description

Product Description

No Cameras Allowed: My Career as an Outlaw Rock and Roll Photographer tells the story, in words and photos, of how Julian David Stone, entirely by sneaking his equipment into concerts, amassed an incredible archive of over ten thousand rock and roll photos. Starting by simply stashing a camera in his socks, then taping equipment all over his body, to finally customizing a jacket to hide equipment from security guards, he shot dozens of the 1980s greatest acts: Prince, U2, the Police, David Bowie, R.E.M., the Ramones, Elvis Costello, the Talking Heads, the Grateful Dead, Joan Jett, and many, many more. Culled from this incredible, never-before-seen archive, this book contains over 250 of his best photos, along with some of the craziest adventures he had as he evaded oversized roadies, aggressive security, and more than a few drunken fans.

Review

An amazing, one-of-a-kind collection of rock-and-roll celebrity photos, "No Cameras Allowed: My Career as an Outlaw Rock and Roll Photographer" is a fascinating browse and a blend of images and stories that is as memorable as the music and the musicians they showcase! An uncommon and rare treat for rock music fans, ""No Cameras Allowed: My Career as an Outlaw Rock and Roll Photographer" is an especially recommended addition to community and academic library Contemporary American Photography and Contemporary Popular Music History collections.

--Midwest Book Review

A large collection of concert photographs portrays a who’s who of 1980s rock ’n’ roll.
In 1983, budding photographer Stone (The Strange Birth, Short Life, and Sudden Death of Justice Girl, 2013) showed up
at a Ramones concert intent on capturing the legendary punk band on film. When a security guard told him his equipment
wasn’t welcome in the venue, he improvised, hiding his lens and camera body in his socks. Thus, a career as an “Outlaw
Rock and Roll Photographer” was born. Over the next several years, he surreptitiously snapped photos of the B-52s,
Duran Duran, R.E.M., and other iconic artists. A selection of that work is displayed in this impressive coffee table book.
The images—shot in both black and white and color—show musicians in the heat of performance. There’s a snarling,
sweaty Joan Jett, a joyous Tom Petty, and Prince, soaring in the air, mid-split. While some photos show an entire band on
stage, the best (and majority) are surprisingly intimate images of a single performer, often isolated in a sea of black. A
close-up of a shirtless Sting shows the Police frontman gazing out at the crowd like a Grecian god. In another, a
pink-suited David Bowie performs, seemingly alone, on stage. While familiar pop stars dominate the work, Stone has
included a few lesser-known acts, like Chequered Past, made up of ex-members of Blondie and the Sex Pistols, and
Haven, “a perfectly fine band that never made it past the 8:00 p.m. slot on a Tuesday night at the Troubadour.” The author
didn’t set out to document a particular scene, nor did he concentrate on a specific genre. In this pleasingly diverse
collection, New Wavers Talking Heads share space with ’60s stalwarts the Grateful Dead and heavy-metal rockers like
Ratt. A few brief essays from Stone provide context for some of the shots and explain his decision to give up rock
photography. But for the most part, he wisely lets his powerful images speak for themselves.
This stunning assemblage of never-before-seen photos is a worthy addition to any rock fan’s library.

--Kirkus Reviews

About the Author

Julian David Stone grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, eventually relocating to Los Angeles to study filmmaking and then enter the entertainment business. Other work besides this book includes screenplays for Disney, Paramount, Sony, and MGM; the full-length play, The Elvis Test; and several short-form documentaries on Frank Sinatra for Warner Bros. He is also the writer and director of the hit cult comedy feature film, Follow the Bitch, which has played to packed houses all around the country and received numerous awards. Recently he began writing books, with his award-winning debut novel, The Strange Birth, Short life, and Sudden Death of Justice Girl, about the world of the 1950s live television, currently being turned into a TV series.

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